A question of giving

And so it’s almost that magical Christmas time again and how quickly this year has flown by. I just spent a few minutes reviewing the topics I’ve blogged in December over the past five years – and what did I discover? Nothing much has changed … the world is in a slightly ‘messier’ state … Amazon has arrived in Melbourne (ho hum) and people are still feeling pressured as Christmas Day draws near.

So what good things are happening? Many might say not a lot in the big picture … and yet through the past twelve months we’ve all experienced life with its joys, sorrows, strengths and weaknesses. This makes me wonder if this year, we might consider ‘giving’ in a completely different way.

For a moment, let’s forget commercialisation, the TV adverts, the champagne and cheese and partying … because really, those commodities exist for a large majority for most of the year anyway. Let’s look a little deeper, at grassroots so to speak:

  • Somehow, we were each given the gift of life!
  • Many of us have given that gift to others
  • In this country we have been privileged to receive the gift of reasonable health care
  • The same goes for food, clothing and education
  • And we have also been given the gift of reasonable freedom and safety, highly prized presents to be treasured
  • Most importantly we own the gift of our mind, that most wondrous miracle that allows us freedom of thought to be used well or otherwise
  • And so, without having to ask for it, we have the gift of questioning …

Can we pause now in the midst of all the Festive Rush to question the important things of life? Can we consider those who have no refuge, family, friends, food or support? Can we look at our own family with new vision, knowing that some individuals don’t need ‘things’ as Christmas gifts, but compassion, understanding and love? Can we give the gift of patience to those relationships we find challenging? Can we give our time to others who are lonely, afraid or ill? And can we give to ourselves as well, the gift of gentleness; the gift of self knowledge with an understanding of our beginnings and their consequent outcomes, and the gift of truly appreciating our own story?

Let’s pause and consider.

Because maybe it’s gifts such as those that just might manifest the magic of Christmas? But then again, there is no real magic in this life – there is only love – and that’s where the story of Christmas all began.

Pauline McKinnon (c) 
December 2017, Melbourne